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“When I first looked at it, an old Pacific Heights mansion, I thought it would be sort of grand and cold and austere, but the house isn’t like that at all,” Goode says. “It’s a very domestic space. The rooms are small and you have a sense of people who lived there. It was an upper-middle-class home for a merchant family, a very domestic space. I felt if they’ll let us come in here and dance around and do what we do, this would be ideal.”. Designed by Peter R. Schmidt for William and Bertha Haas, the Haas-Lilienthal House speaks of an era when San Francisco’s Gilded Age fortunes fed the region’s rapidly cohering civic culture. The extended Haas/Hellman clan left their mark across the state, contributing to the commonweal from UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business and Stern Grove to Golden Gate Park’s Steinhart Aquarium and eventually Hardly Strictly Bluegrass. In the midst of another era of rapidly increasing economic inequality, “Still Standing” draws on stories from the performers and Goode, who was inspired by the community-building Jewish ethos known as tikkun olam (to repair the world).

The program repeats in Walnut Creek Saturday afternoon and evening, and personalized ballet shoes zip-it cinch pack with free personalization & free shipping bg616 again over the coming weeks in Carmel, Mountain View and San Francisco, Presenting ‘The Christmas Ballet’, Through: Dec, 24, Lesher Center for the Arts, Walnut Creek, 2 and 8 p.m, Nov, 19, $25-$73, Sunset Center, Carmel, 8 p.m, Dec, 2 and 2 p.m, Dec, 3, $57-$73, Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 8 p.m, Dec, 7-9, 2 and 8 p.m, Dec, 10 and 2 p.m, Dec, 11, $25-$72, Theater, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, 8 p.m, Dec, 15-16, 2 and 8 p.m, Dec, 17, 2 and 7 p.m, Dec, 18, 8 p.m, Dec, 20, 2 and 8 p.m, Dec, 21, 8 p.m, Dec, 22, 2 and 8 p.m, Dec, 23 and 2 p.m, Dec, 24..

Of course, there are stars. And then there are megastars. And no one is shining brighter in 2017 than Taylor Swift. She was, by far, the main attraction on Dec. 2 at the SAP Center. Is anyone surprised to hear that Swift lived up the hype — and then some — in San Jose? No one should be. She’s done nothing but beat even the loftiest of expectations during her entire career. Indeed, she looked poised in San Jose to dominate throughout 2018. It’s hard to imagine how even any of her so-called “haters” — who seem to fuel so many of Swift’s lyrics and accomplishments — would have anything negative to say after seeing this excellent performance.

That’s the case, Lerner says, with a guy telling someone: “I’m sorry that you were upset by the joke I made at the dinner, My intention wasn’t to insult personalized ballet shoes zip-it cinch pack with free personalization & free shipping bg616 anyone.” He should instead say something that shows he understands what he did wrong and won’t repeat it: “The joke I made was insensitive and inappropriate, I get it, and I won’t do it again.”, Another bad apology happens when the offender expects her apology to be an “automatic ticket” to forgiveness and redemption, pushing the wronged person to get over his hurt feelings before he’s ready..

The opera was written to celebrate King Louis XV’s victory in the Battle of Fontenoy, but the pairing of Rameau and Voltaire was an uneasy one. Not surprisingly, the libretto’s thinly veiled suggestion that kings earn the loyalty of their subjects with benevolence, not conquest, met with a tepid response. Its depiction of Bélus and Bacchus as bellicose, perpetually inebriated and possibly promiscuous didn’t sit well with the king. Rameau hastily revised the opera in 1746, but McGegan is using the original, more pointed, version, from Rameau’s own manuscript, owned by UC Berkeley and housed in the university’s Jean Gray Hargrove Music Library. Today, the message comes across brilliantly.


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